EECS Grads Making a Difference in the World

Gideon Stein started graduate studies at MIT (EECS) in late 1990, receiving his MSc in 1993 under advisors John Wyatt and Berthold Horn and his PhD in 1998 under advisors Eric Grimson and Amnon Shashua (of The Hebrew University, Jerusalem) in the field of computer vision.

Gideon Stein started graduate studies at MIT (EECS) in late 1990, receiving his MSc in 1993 under advisors John Wyatt and Berthold Horn and his PhD in 1998 under advisors Eric Grimson and Amnon Shashua (of The Hebrew University, Jerusalem) in the field of computer vision.

During his summers as an undergraduate student in electrical engineering at the Technion in Haifa, Israel, Gideon Stein, worked at the Columbia University Medical School in NYC, where he was introduced to medical image processing and analysis. He noted then “how difficult it is to come up with algorithms to solve tasks that appear so effortless to humans—such as image recognition and segmentation.” This experience cemented his decision to go to graduate school to study how the human vision system works.

Stein started graduate studies at MIT (EECS) in late 1990, receiving his MSc in 1993 under advisors John Wyatt and Berthold Horn and his PhD in 1998 under advisors Eric Grimson and Amnon Shashua (of The Hebrew University, Jerusalem) in the field of computer vision. After graduation he worked for a year at the AI Lab as a post doc with Eric Grimson on the Visual Surveillance and Monitoring (VSAM) project.

During his stay at the AI lab, then an entity housed apart from the main MIT campus in Technology Square, Stein found that the multidisciplinary atmosphere of the lab helped him hone various skills, which later served him well as an R&D leader. In addition to computer programming and computer vision algorithms he gained exposure to modern circuit design and board layout techniques, DSP programming and even mechanical design and the use of milling machines and lathes.

Stein reflected on his MIT experience: “Working, discussing and exchanging ideas with the clearly very bright people at MIT, gave me not only the confidence to express my ideas and solutions but also the humility to listen to ideas from other people, to understand that someone else might have a better solution and to pay attention.”

In spring 1999, following his post doctoral work at the AI Lab, Stein was invited by Prof. Shashua to help start a new company he was founding together with Mr. Ziv Aviram: Mobileye Vision Technologies Ltd. Mobileye develops computer vision based driver assistance systems to improve driving safety with applications such as lane departure warning and forward collision warning. Stein was VP for R&D at Mobileye for five years before switching to his current position as Chief Research Scientist.

With an eye to doing something significant to help society, Stein noted: “It is possible that at Mobileye I am able to do just that, if our technology can help make a dent in the large number of fatalities and injuries on today’s roads.”

Pages: 1 2 3

Leave a Reply

Replies which add to the content of this article in the EECS Newsletter are welcome. The Department reserves the right to moderate all comments. If you would like to provide any updated information please send an email to newsletter@eecs.mit.edu.