New Faculty Profiles

Tim Berners-Lee

Tim Berners-Lee

Tim Berners-Lee a graduate of Oxford University, England, is the 3COM Founders Professor of Engineering in the School of Engineering, with a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Laboratory for Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence (CSAIL) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) where he also heads the Decentralized Information Group (DIG). He is co-Director of the Web Science Research Initiative (WSRI) and is a Professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of Southampton, UK. He directs the World Wide Web Consortium, founded in 1994.

In 1989 he invented the World Wide Web, an internet-based hypermedia initiative for global information sharing while at CERN, the European Particle Physics Laboratory. He wrote the first Web client and server in 1990. His specifications of URLs, HTTP and HTML were refined as Web technology spread. In 2001 he became a fellow of the Royal Society. He has been the recipient of several international awards including the Japan Prize, the Millennium Technology Prize and Germany’s Die Quadriga award. In 2004 he was knighted by H.M. Queen Elizabeth and in 2007 he was awarded the Order of Merit. He is the author of “Weaving the Web”.

Constantinos Daskalakis

Constantinos Daskalakis

Konstantinos Daskalakis will join the EECS Department as Assistant Professor and a member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in the fall of 2009. Before joining MIT he will spend a year in nearby Microsoft Research-New England as a postdoctoral fellow, pursuing research at the interface of Computer Science and the Social Sciences.

Costis grew up in Athens, Greece, where he received an undergraduate degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the National Technical University of Athens. In 2004 he moved to California where he completed his Ph.D. studies in Computer Science at U. C. Berkeley under the supervision of Professor Christos H. Papadimitriou. Costis is interested in Algorithmic Game Theory and Applied Probability, particularly in computational aspects of markets and the Internet, in social networks, and in computational problems in Biology. His research is motivated by two questions: “how does the algorithmic perspective influence Economics, Biology, Physics, and the Social Sciences?” and “how does the study of computational problems arising from areas outside Computer Science transform the Theory of Computation?”

The Game Theory Society honored Costis and his collaborators, Paul Goldberg and Christos Papadimitriou, with the first Game Theory and Computer Science Prize for their work on the Computational Complexity of Nash equilibria. Costis was also the recipient of a Best Student Paper Award at the ACM Conference on Electronic Commerce, and of a Microsoft Research Fellowship in honor of Dean A. Richard Newton. In his spare time he likes to explore nature, to hike, and to ski.

Armando Solar-Lezama

Armando Solar-Lezama

Armando Solar-Lezama joins the EECS Department as Assistant Professor and a member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in fall, 2008.

After growing up in Mexico City, Armando received bachelor’s degrees in Computer Science and Mathematics from Texas A&M University, where he also worked as a programmer writing massively parallel neutron transport simulations. In 2003, he moved to Berkeley where he recently earned his Ph.D. under the guidance of Rastislav Bodik.

Solar-Lezama’s research focuses on software synthesis. His goal is to automate a lot of the complexity in software development, while maintaining programmer control over the implementation. The promise is that programmers will be able to focus on the high-level implementation strategy and delegate the mechanics of implementation to the synthesizer.

Solar-Lezama’s recent work has been on programming by sketching; a form of program synthesis whose key novelty is the use of partial programs to communicate insight between the programmer and the synthesizer. The partial programs, called sketches, are just ordinary programs with holes for the synthesizer to fill in. The sketches are very close to the high-level picture in the programmer’s head: they contain the overall structure of the solution but omit the low level details. The technique has been applied to a variety of challenging problem domains such as cryptography and even concurrent data-structures. On his free time, Armando enjoys learning history, eating out and walking in the city.

Nickolai Zeldovich

Nickolai Zeldovich

Nickolai Zeldovich joined the EECS Department in July 2008 as Assistant Professor and a member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. After receiving his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in EECS from MIT in 2002, he moved to Stanford University, where he completed his PhD in computer science in 2008. During his stay at Stanford, Nickolai co-founded a startup company called MokaFive that focuses on using hardware virtualization to simplify system management problems.

Nickolai’s research focuses on building secure systems, and in particular, on designing low-level mechanisms and abstractions for enforcing high-level application security goals. For example, he built a new operating system, called HiStar, whose small kernel can enforce application security policies, by tracking the flow of data, even if the applications themselves are buggy. In his spare time, Nickolai enjoys foraging for berries and bicycling.

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