New Faculty Profiles

Li-Shiuan Peh, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Li-Shiuan Peh, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Li-Shiuan Peh joins the EECS Department as Associate Professor in the fall of 2009, and is a member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, as well as an associate member of the Microsystems Technology Laboratories.

Li-Shiuan grew up in Singapore, where she received a bachelor’s degree in Computing from National University of Singapore. In 1997, she moved to Stanford University where she completed her Ph.D. studies in Computer Science under the supervision of Professor William J. Dally. From Stanford, she went to Princeton in 2002, where she spent seven years on the faculty at Princeton University’s Department of Electrical Engineering.

Peh’s research interests lie in on-chip networks, parallel computer architectures and wireless networked systems. Through her research, Peh seeks answers to the question of how to interconnect and manage hundreds and thousands of nodes, where the nodes span from processor cores on a chip to phones across a city. Specifically, her group has been exploring a network-driven approach where an intelligent network fabric handles all required coordination in addition to communication. Her research findings to date have led to several awards, including the Computing Research Association’s Anita Borg Early Career Award in 2007, the Sloan Research Fellowship in 2006, and the National Science Foundation CAREER award in 2003. Outside of work, she enjoys playing with her two kids, aged 2 and 5.

Patrick Jaillet, the Edmund K. Turner Professor in EECS

Patrick Jaillet, the Edmund K. Turner Professor in EECS

Patrick Jaillet is the Edmund K. Turner Professor in EECS and a member of LIDS. He was Head of CEE at MIT from 2002 to 2009, where he currently holds a courtesy appointment. From 1991 to 2002 he was a professor at the University of Texas in Austin, the last five years as the chair of the department of management science and information systems.

He co-founded and was director of UT Austin’s center for computational finance. Before his appointment in Austin, he was a member of the faculty at the center for applied mathematics at the Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussée in Paris. On earning a diplôme d’ingénieur from France (1981), Jaillet came to MIT where he received an SM in transportation (1982) and a PhD in operations research (1985).

Patrick’s research interests include on-line problems; real-time and dynamic optimization; network design and optimization; probabilistic combinatorial optimization; and financial engineering. In his free time, he enjoys spending time with his family, road biking, and sailing.

Dana Weinstein, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, Principal Investigator in MTL

Dana Weinstein, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, Principal Investigator in MTL

Dana Weinstein joined the EECS Department in August 2009 as Assistant Professor and a member of the Microsystems Technology Laboratories at MIT. Dana received her bachelor’s degree in Physics from UC Berkeley in 2004, where she worked on ultra-fast X-ray streak camera design at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley
National Laboratory. She then moved to Cornell University, where she completed her Ph.D. in Applied Physics in 2009, working on Radio Frequency (RF) Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS).

Weinstein’s research focuses on hybrid MEMS-CMOS devices for low-power wireless communication, microprocessor clocking, and sensing applications. In particular, she is working to harness the benefits of acoustic vibrations to enhance the performance of next-generation electron devices. Her recent work on Resonant Body Transistors, in which a field effect transistor (FET) is embedded inside a MEMS resonator, has yielded the highest frequency resonance measured in silicon to date.

Additionally, Dana is pursuing the integration of such hybrid devices into CMOSbased systems, including low-power, narrow-bandwidth low noise amplifiers for transceivers and low phase-noise oscillator arrays for clock generation and temperature sensing in microprocessors.

Ron Weiss, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Biological Engineering

Ron Weiss, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Biological Engineering

Ron Weiss joined the MIT EECS Department and the Department of Biological Engineering as an Associate Professor in July 2009.

Weiss earned an undergraduate degree in Computer Science and Economics from Brandeis University in 1992 and subsequently received a PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT in 2001. He then held a faculty appointment in the Electrical Engineering and Molecular Biology Departments at Princeton University between 2001 and 2009, and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2007.

Ron Weiss’s research focuses primarily on synthetic biology, where he programs cell behavior by constructing and modeling biochemical and cellular computing systems. A major thrust of his work is the synthesis of gene networks that are engineered to perform in vivo analog and digital logic computation as a means to obtain precise control over cell behavior. He is also interested in programming cell aggregates to perform coordinated tasks using cell-cell communication based on chemical diffusion mechanisms such as quorum sensing.

During the last eight years, the Weiss lab has constructed and tested many novel in vivo biochemical logic circuits and intercellular communication systems. The research projects in the Weiss lab focus both on foundational technology for synthetic biology as well as the pursuit of novel approaches to several biomedical applications enabled by synthetic biology (e.g. tissue engineering, diabetes, and cancer therapy). Weiss is interested in both hands-on experimental work and in implementing software infrastructures for simulation and design work.

2 Responses to “New Faculty Profiles”

  1. Have heard only good things about Patrick Jaillet! hope he’s doing well.

  2. Kristine says:

    Patrick is really doing good in his field, and there are many positive feedback about him. I hear that he is doing very well now. :)

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