Spring term classes: 6.302 Feedback Systems

  1. 6.302 recitation instructor Taylor Barton demonstrating the single inverted pendulum - a subset of her M.Eng. thesis project
    6.302 recitation instructor Taylor Barton demonstrating the single inverted pendulum - a subset of her M.Eng. thesis project "Stabilizing the Dual Inverted Pendulum: A Practical Approach" completed in Feb., 2008.
  2. A student in 6.302 works on completing the Maglev project, May 2010.
    A student in 6.302 works on completing the Maglev project, May 2010.
  3. Students work to complete final maglev project in 6.302 lab.
    Students work to complete final maglev project in 6.302 lab.
  4. It works!  the maglev project that is. 6.302 lab, May 2010.
    It works! the maglev project that is. 6.302 lab, May 2010.
  5. This maglev project is a success!  6.302 final project.
    This maglev project is a success! 6.302 final project.
  6. Prof. Roberge gives the 6.302 Train Lecture, May 13, 2010.
    Prof. Roberge gives the 6.302 Train Lecture, May 13, 2010.

6.302 Feedback Systems

MIT subject listings description of 6.302: Introduction to design of feedback systems. Properties and advantages of feedback systems. Time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures. Stability and degree of stability. Nyquist criterion. Frequency-domain design. Root locus method. Compensation techniques. Application to a wide variety of physical systems. Some previous laboratory experience with electronic systems is assumed (6.002, 6.071, or 16.04). 4 Engineering Design Points.
J. K. Roberge

A short interview with Jim Roberge about the 6.302 – 6.301 sequence

Since his early days as an assistant electrical engineering professor, starting in 1967, Jim Roberge has been teaching the 6.301 (Solid-State Circuits) – 6.302 sequence of classes. Paul Gray and Campbell Searle organized the lectures at that time and Jim taught recitations from both 6.301 and 6.302. He remarks about this now: “It was a great learning experience — working with world-renowned experts and for developing professionally.”

The classes arose through the SEEC (semiconductor electronics education committee) book series that was eventually published in 1969. Roberge comments, “I particularly recollect Campbell Searle’s response to frequent interest by TAs in exciting new ideas for teaching. He said, ‘Jim, there are things you can teach at this level and things you can’t.’ (I and many new professors had wonderful ideas for teaching…not always practical).”

“I’ve had many memorable TAs come up through the ranks in 6.302 including Tom Lee now at Stanford, Liz Bradley, who taught with me, Rick Carley, Dave Trumper, Kent Lundberg, Joel Dawson, to name a few and more recently Taylor Barton and Willie Sanchez. Over the years being a TA became a kind of cult thing.”

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