Spring term classes: 6.01 Intro to EECS I

  1. 6.01, Intro to EECS I lab class
    6.01, Intro to EECS I lab class
  2. 6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
    6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
  3. 6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
    6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
  4. 6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
    6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
  5. 6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
    6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
  6. 6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
    6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
  7. 6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
    6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
  8. 6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
    6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
  9. 6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
    6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
  10. 6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
    6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
  11. 6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
    6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
  12. 6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
    6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
  13. 6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
    6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
  14. 6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
    6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
  15. 6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
    6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
  16. 6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class
    6.01 Intro to EECS I spring term 2010 lab class

6.01, Into to EECS I

Prof. Leslie Kaelbling, one of the primary developers of the 6.01 course material (along with EECS faculty members Denny Freeman, Jacob White, Tomas Lozano-Perez, and Hal Abelson) has been the lead faculty member this Spring term also delivering the class lectures. Other instructors this term included Dept. Head Eric Grimson, who will be the lecturer next fall and EECS faculty members Isaac Chuang and Tomas Lozano-Perez.

Leslie Kaelbling reflected on 6.01:

“We’ve been offering 6.01 since we started a pilot with 20 brave students in Spring of 2006. Now, we have about 250 in the Spring semesters! It is offered in 4 lab sections, so students still have a chance to do real hands-on labs with circuits and robots.

The main goals of the course are to show students the power of systematic design, with systems of primitive elements, means of combining the primitives to make more powerful wholes, and means of abstracting away from the details of the combinations to essentially make new primitives. We explore this concept in the contexts of software, linear control systems, circuits, probabilistic estimation and planning.

Another emphasis of the course is connecting theory to practice: we try to show the students how theoretical analysis methods can make it easier to design and construct real-world systems that work well in practice.”

A brief interview with Joe Colosimo, a sophomore lab assistant (LA) for 6.01 for Spring term 2010

Q. What aspect of lab assisting did you really like — and would recommend to future LAs?

Joe Colosimo “Teaching is a powerful learning tool; you need to have a very good idea of how something operates when you explain it to someone. When you are helping someone who doesn’t understand a concept and you say something that triggers the “oh, I get it now!” response, you know that you’ve done a good job. Moreover, you’ve proven to yourself that you have a strong grasp of the material.”

We had a lot of fun during the staff meetings, too, and the free dinner every week was pretty nice. :)

Q. How would you compare 6.01 to other classes you have taken? (in general and at MIT EECS…)?

Joe Colosimo “6.01 is a unique course because its primary goal is to expose students to a wide variety of topics in both EE and CS. As a result, this course allows students to explore many different subjects to find one that they like, thereby aiding them in choosing future, more specialized classes. What separates 6.01 from the other broad “GIR-like” classes that a student may take in other departments is the lab experience. Most of the learning of the class comes from hands-on experience in designing solutions for the problems posed in the lab using knowledge gained from lecture.

Q. Any memorable experience in your lab assisting that you could share?

Joe Colosimo “The design lab section that I assisted in was on Friday from 2-5. Working through the often-challenging labs is not every student’s idea of a relaxing way to end the week, so it was especially important for the LAs and TAs to remain very involved in order to keep an upbeat atmosphere. Between the candy and the silly costumes (including “dress up as a circuit element” day), I think we did a pretty good job. The section instructor, Ali Mohammad, was almost single-handedly responsible for this awesomeness, but we all helped out.”

About Joe:

I’m from Lexington, MA, which is about 10 miles away from MIT; it has been my goal to study here for as long as I can remember. My primary interests lie in high-speed digital technologies and embedded systems; I’ve had opportunities to learn and apply my knowledge in this field both in and out of the classroom. I enjoy coming up with new projects that combine lots of different skills: from mechanical and low-level electrical engineering to high-level software development.

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